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Foil Wrapped Walleye – by Ellery Horsman

Foil Wrapped Walleye – by Ellery Horsman

Foil Wrapped Walleye – by Ellery Horsman

Foilwrapped Walleye – by Ellery Horsman

First off: Build a hardwood fire so you have a good bed of coals to cook your foil wraps. Beaver wood from an abandoned beaver house is probably about the best wood available.
1 roll of heavy duty, 25″ wide, aluminum foil
8 small walleye (about 14″, pretty easy to get 😉
4 large, pre cooked, sliced potatoes, about 95% done.
2 large onions
2 cans of sliced mushrooms, drained
2 green peppers
24 slices of lean bacon (you can chop into 1″ pieces if you want to)
1 tomato, sliced and 1 lemon, very thinly sliced
Various seasonings: I like to use lemon pepper, lemon and herb, seasoned salt, roasted garlic and pepper, Indian masala, cajun and regular salt and pepper.
Cooking mitts (essential) and long handled spatula.
After slabbing the walleyes, remove the rib cage and skin the fish.  Now you will have to remove the remaining rib cage bones (or pin bones) by slicing length ways, along the lateral line of the fish fillet right to the end of the fillet (the bones stop just past the stomach cavity).  You can feel the bones if you run your finger lengthways above the stomach cavity; then you know what bones you have to remove.  After removing these bones, you’ll wind up with a thick “back” piece and a thin “belly” piece.  It is crucial that these bones are removed as their cooking environment does not get “grease” hot so as to soften up the bones for easy consumption.
Start with a wide (25″), heavy duty, sheet of aluminum foil about three feet long (you’ll have to have help to hold it down on the table if there is even a slight wind).  Next, place 3 slices of bacon (stretched) onto one end of the foil to about 4″ or 5″ from each end, making the base around 5″ wide.  The bacon will not only lightly flavour the food but also prevent too much burning if you get a hot spot on your bed of coals (if you’ve chopped up the bacon, use about the equivalent of 3 slices to place on the bottom).
On top of the bacon, place sliced onions, sliced potatoes, sliced mushrooms, sliced or diced green pepper,  season to taste, then carefully try to fit about four pieces of fish fillets on top, also season to taste.  Then reverse the process ending up with placing 3 slices or chopped equivalent of bacon on top of the 4″ or 5″ of ingredients.  Carefully cover the ingredients with the remaining foil so that you wind up wrapping it about three times, keeping in mind the top from the bottom.  After sealing up the ends (crimping), place each packet of fish on a grate over a bed of hardwood coals, turning over 3 times for about 5 minutes each side.  You will have to monitor the packets for hot spots and alternate if necessary so they get evenly cooked.  When they puff out slightly round (they are cooking in steam heat), they are probably done but still, leave them cook for about 20 minutes.  Ensure you are not cooking with a flame, just coals.  You know, one might even cheat a little bit and get some briquettes instead of trying to find dry, beaver wood. Also, if it is windy out, try to place some wind break around the fire pit so the heat doesn’t blow away!!
I usually make four packages and season each one differently with: sliced lemon & lemon pepper; sliced tomato & cajun; regular seasoning and Indian masala with lemon and herbs.
This recipe will feed about 4 or 5 people who have good appetites!  Incidently, this recipe takes less time to prepare than a traditional shore lunch PLUS you are not deep frying anything!
This recipe was inspired by two good friends, Max & Becky.  I’ve added a few things from the plain fish we made one day on Three Mike Lake portage.
Ellery Horsman – Box 221, Sioux Narrows, Ontario   CANADA  P0X 1N0   E-mail:  elleryhorsman@gmail.com     Phone:   807 407 4150

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